Soul Food Love
Peanut Chicken Stew
Congressional Cookbook: The Junior League and the Congress
Library Desk: Doors and Desks
Sleigh Bed: Texas and Louisianna
Keepsakes: Earth Stars and Sky Stars
Portrait Table: Icebergs and Angels
Battle of Nashville: Slaves and Soldiers
Maid of Honor Portrait: Three Third Grade Bridesmaids and a Sexy Brilliant Woman Priest
Red Dining Room: Table and Chairs
Jubilee Singers with Lavender: Alfred Stieglitz and Fisk
Mirror Portrait Caroline: Caroline and her Portrait
Sofa: Couches and Dreams
Silver Coffee Urn, Saul Martin Portrait: Zelda Sayre and Gatsby
Harlem Chairs: Tammany Hall and Harlem
Tuskegee Wardrobe: Brownies and Smithies
Portrait Chair: Harper Lee and Sigourney
Dear's Ice Cubes
Working Library: Cynara and Windsor, and Hope
Me and My Blog
Fort Pillow Massacre: Nathan Bedford Forrest and Madison Smartt Bell
My Boots: Nancy Sinatra and Roy Rogers
Longpage, 1913: Stephen Stills and Frank Lloyd Wright
Cold Cucumber Soup
Six Cases of Cookbooks: Julia Child and Caroline Williams
Magnolias: Magnolias and Magnolia
Statute of Alexander Pushkin: Pushkin and Othello
Take The Ow Out Of Now: Buddha and Nietzche
Stars and Bars: Stars and Stripes and Stars and Bars
Joan's Nicoise
New York Times Editorial: Copyright and the First Amendment, or Margaret Mitchell and John Seigenthaler
Soul Food Love

    Joan's Nicoise

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    Joan's Nicoise

    I've had two quite extraordinary mothers-in-law, Joan Marie Bontemps Williams, Caroline's grandmother, and Florence Steele Kidd, my second husband's mother. This salad, Joan's Nicoise, was created as a tribute to Joan Williams. In many ways Joan is the founder of the Soul Food Love feast. She left Caroline her immense, over one thousand book strong, cookbook collection. Living  to eat, and eating to live with Joan's cookbook collection sheltering and inspiring us has brought me many of the happiest and healthiest hours of my life.  Thinking about that--I send more thanks up to Joan now buried with her husband and her parents in Nashville's Greenwood Cemetery. Langston Hughes referred to Joan as one of the golden babies of the Harlem Renaissance.  I knew her as a stalwart pillar of the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville, the original kitchen sink warrior, who did battle and financed wars wearing nothing more frightening than a blue and flowery housedress. All the good wishes that rose in the room around her cradle had come true by the time she was laid in her grave. She had her disappointments, but she did not disappoint. I type that without sentiment and without reservation. The woman exceeded all expectations. If was If you want to know more about that, and how it came her husband got the campus of a University named after him, and Joan got a salad take a look at the Nana chapter in Soul Food Love.